EvidenceAlerts

Davidson KW, Barry MJ, Mangione CM, et al. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2022 Apr 26;327(16):1577-1584. doi: 10.1001/jama.2022.4983. (Evidence-based guideline)
Abstract

Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in the US, accounting for more than 1 in 4 deaths. Each year, an estimated 605?000 people in the US have a first myocardial infarction and an estimated 610?000 experience a first stroke.

Objective: To update its 2016 recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review on the effectiveness of aspirin to reduce the risk of CVD events (myocardial infarction and stroke), cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality in persons without a history of CVD. The systematic review also investigated the effect of aspirin use on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in primary CVD prevention populations, as well as the harms (particularly bleeding) associated with aspirin use. The USPSTF also commissioned a microsimulation modeling study to assess the net balance of benefits and harms from aspirin use for primary prevention of CVD and CRC, stratified by age, sex, and CVD risk level.

Population: Adults 40 years or older without signs or symptoms of CVD or known CVD (including history of myocardial infarction or stroke) who are not at increased risk for bleeding (eg, no history of gastrointestinal ulcers, recent bleeding, other medical conditions, or use of medications that increase bleeding risk).

Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD events in adults aged 40 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk has a small net benefit. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that initiating aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD events in adults 60 years or older has no net benefit.

Recommendation: The decision to initiate low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD in adults aged 40 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk should be an individual one. Evidence indicates that the net benefit of aspirin use in this group is small. Persons who are not at increased risk for bleeding and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily are more likely to benefit. (C recommendation) The USPSTF recommends against initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD in adults 60 years or older. (D recommendation).

Ratings
Discipline Area Score
Internal Medicine 7 / 7
Cardiology 7 / 7
Public Health 7 / 7
Family Medicine (FM)/General Practice (GP) 6 / 7
General Internal Medicine-Primary Care(US) 6 / 7
Comments from MORE raters

General Internal Medicine-Primary Care(US) rater

I think this has been well communicated in the clinical world. With all the new antiplatelets on the market, it is an important article to highlight. People don't really always think ASA is a drug.

Internal Medicine rater

Based on new trial evidence and updated analyses of the evidence from primary CVD prevention populations and longer-term follow-up data, the USPSTF revised 2016 recommendations are extremely useful for contemporary clinical practice. As a full-time hospitalist, I noted a significant proportion of patients even in their 90s who are still receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis with potential risk for death from hemorrhagic complications.
Comments from EvidenceAlerts subscribers

Dr. javier armando rodriguez prada (5/15/2022 7:06 AM)

There is still no construct or critical appraisal tools to assess the certainty of the evidence for microsimulation studies. These types of results should be interpreted with caution.